Concurrent Sessions 23 – 33

Date

March 15-18, 2020

Draft Agenda

Monday, March 16, 2020
2:45 PM – 4:15 PM

Learn more about special tracks (identified in red) offered during the conference

Session 23 Y&YA

2:45 PM – 4:15 PM

Bayshore 5 ~ 90 Minute Symposium
Building Bridges: Implementing a System of Care in Ohio for Transitional Age Youth in Two Adjacent Counties (Cuyahoga & Lorain)
Symposium Chair: Chris Stormann, Ph.D, Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; Discussant: Grace Kolliesuah, MA, MSW, LSW, Bureau of Children and Families, Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, Columbus, OH

The Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services and the non-profit administrative services organization Wingspan Care Group are implementing the SAMHSA funded Ohio Healthy Transitions Project (OHTP) to serve transitional age youth (TAY) aged 16-25 with a serious emotional disturbance, serious mental illness, or co-occurring mental health and intellectual developmental disability in two adjacent counties.  The counties are Cuyahoga (Cleveland) and Lorain (Elyria).  This presentation will highlight key elements of the service delivery model and the use of workgroups to create a logic model, needs assessment, and CQI dashboards based on the GPRA-NOMs and outcome tools in year two. Please join our interactive symposium to hear about the successes and challenges and share your experiences with members of the OHTP team, including the TAY Coordinator, director, providers, state partners, and evaluators. Attendees will leave with tangible tools and examples they can take back to their community.

Creating the Needs Assessment for the Healthy Transitions: Improving Life Trajectories for Youth and Young Adults with Serious Mental Disorders Program
Chris Stormann, PhD, Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; Makayla Lang, BS, Ohio Healthy Transitions Project, Wingspan Care Group, Shaker Heights, OH; Ben Wenger, MBA MSSA LISW-S, Adoption, Foster Care, Transitional/Independent Living Services, Bellefare JCB, Shaker Heights, OH; Grace Kolliesuah, MA, MSW, LISW, Holly Jones, MSSA, Bureau of Children, Youth, and Families, Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, Columbus, OH

A mixed-methods model to complete the needs assessment using stakeholder and collaboration surveys, workgroups, interviews with TAY, service utilization data, previous grantee reports, and literature reviews is shared. Findings/needs include behavioral health, multi-system involvement, engagement in services, employment and education, physical health needs, housing, basic needs, and peer and informal supports.  Presenters will discuss the strengths and challenges associated with conducting the needs assessment and the use of a logic model to support strategic planning.

Successes Entering Year Two: Process, Obstacles, Barriers and Improvements to Service Delivery for Transitional Age Youth
Ben Wenger, MBA MSSA LISW-S, Adoption, Foster Care, Transitional/Independent Living Services, Bellefaire JCB, Shaker Heights, OH; Jill Sadowsky, MSW, LISW-S, Ohio Healthy Transitions Project, Bellefaire JCB, Shaker Heights, OH; Jolene Thomas, BS, Project Director for Ohio Healthy Transitions Project, Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, Columbus, OH; Holly Jones, MSSA, Bureau of Children, Youth, and Families, Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, Columbus, OH; Chris Stormann, PhD, Begun Center for Violence Prevention, Education and Research, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH

This presentation will describe the Ohio Healthy Transitions Project service delivery model, including referral, intake, services, the navigator & youth coordinator role, and important successes and challenges entering the second year of the grant.  Presenters will discuss the development of the Monthly Activity Form (MAF) to monitor progress using the TIP model, and how it is being used to track the types of referrals and linkages being made to improve service delivery.

Implementing Dashboards to Generate IDEAS: Continuous Quality Improvement Using Data, Evaluation, and Analytics
Erin Williams, MA, Innovation, Wingspan Care Group, Shaker Heights, OH; Chris Stormann, PhD, Begun Center for Violence Prevention Research and Education, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH; Ben Wenger, MBA MSSA LISW-S, Adoption, Foster Care, Transitional/Independent Living Services, Bellefaire JCB, Shaker Heights, OH; Holly Jones, MSSA, Bureau of Children, Youth, and Families, Ohio Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services, Columbus, OH; Makayla Lang, BS, Ohio Healthy Transitions Project, Wingspan Care Group, Shaker Heights, OH

This presentation will present and discuss how data are combined from disparate sources using interactive dashboards to provide real-time feedback to program staff to generate IDEAS (Improvements through Data, Evaluations, and Analytics) and provide data-informed services.  Included in this discussion will be the use of tracking tools, GPRA-NOMs in outcomes reports, and the processes being used to develop indicators and benchmarks via normative and criterion-based content within the dashboards.

Session 24 EBP

2:45 PM – 3:45 PM
Bayshore 6 ~ 60-Minute Discussion
Academic Workforce Preparation for Evidence-Based Practice
Rosalyn Bertram, PhD, School of Social Work, University of Missouri-Kansas City, Kansas City, MO; Dana Marlowe, PhD, Graduate School of Social Service, Fordham University, West Harrison, NY; Elisabeth Cannata, PhD, Community-Based Family Services & Practice Innovation, Wheeler Clinic, Plainville, CT; Suzanne Kerns, PhD, Center for Effective Interventions, University of Denver – Graduate School of Social Work, Denver, CO

How do masters level professional degree programs prepare future practitioners to deliver evidence-based practice? This discussion hour synthesizes results from three related North American studies conducted by participants in the Child and Family Evidence-Based Practice Consortium that addressed this question. Findings form the basis for audience discussion of how behavioral health and other service programs are becoming or can be more actively collaborate with academic programs for more relevant workforce preparation.

3:45 PM – 4:15 PM
Bayshore 6 ~ 30-Minute Discussion
Collaboration Amidst Fragmentation: An Examination of Two Interdisciplinary Efforts in the St. Louis Region
Riisa Rawlins-Easley, MSW, Social Work, University of Missouri – St. Louis, Saint Louis, MO; Serena Muhammad, St. Louis Mental Health Board, St, Louis, MO; Angela Brown, St. Louis Regional Health Commission, St. Louis, MO; Mockia Shelton, MSW, Cornerstones of Care, Kansas City, MO

This presentation will discuss the challenges of multi-sector collaboration by examining two federally funded regional initiatives designed to enhance integrated service delivery. The System of Care – St. Louis Region and the University of Missouri collaborative’ s Behavioral Health Workforce Education and Training Initiative work to understand and address underutilization rooted in system fragmentation from both a systems and practice level. Stakeholder feedback across both initiatives suggest infrastructure, convenience, and reciprocal communication are essential to successful integration efforts.  This symposium will discuss the implications of these findings for future multi-sector collaboration efforts.

Session 25 CW

2:45 PM – 3:15 PM
Bayshore 7 ~ 30-Minute Paper
Making Exploitation Visible: Using a Validated Screening Tool to Identify Commercially Sexually Exploited Children
Danna Basson, MPP, PhD, WestCoast Children’s Clinic, Oakland, CA

Commercial sexual exploitation (CSE) of children remains poorly understood and difficult to recognize. As a result, 75% of exploited young people endure multiple years of abuse before anyone intervenes. To address the need for early identification, credible prevalence estimates, and improved protection for youth, we piloted and validated (using a statewide sample of 5537 youth in 45 agencies) a screening tool to identify exploited youth. We describe the validity evidence and implementation of the tool.

3:15 PM – 4:15 PM
Bayshore 7 ~ 60 Minute Discussion Hour
Youth Peer Support in Child Welfare  Harnessing the Power of Lived Experience to Improve Outcomes for Foster Youth
Lacy Dichary, MS, MBA, Jammie Gardner, AA, Crissy Oyervides, Youth ERA, Eugene, OR

Youth ERA shares over ten years of experience delivering youth peer support through the lens of lived experience to its work with youth in the foster care system. YE believes sharing its approaches to agencies will improve outcomes for foster youth. This workshop provides an overview of Youth Peer Support in Child Welfare Training, unique topics, competencies, workforce needs, and possible funding models to promote and develop programming of Youth Peer Support in Child Welfare.

Session 26

2:45 PM – 3:15 PM
Esplanade 1 ~ 30-Minute Paper
Trauma Recovery Initiative (TRI) Center: Trends and Key Findings of the Trauma-Informed Care Organizational Survey (2013-2018)
Donna Burton, PhD, Connie Walker, PhD, Alexandra Albizu-Jacob, MPH, Child and Family Studies, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL

In recognition of the impact of trauma on the youth and families they serve, the Children’s Home Society of Florida (CHS) has made becoming a more trauma-informed organization a priority focus through its ongoing participation in the Trauma Recovery Initiative (TRI) Center. As part of a broader evaluation, this presentation will review key findings and trends from the CHS Trauma-Informed Care Organizational Survey administered from 2013 to 2018.

3:15 PM – 3:45 PM
Esplanade 1 ~ 30-Minute Paper
A Mixed Methods Outcome Evaluation of the Technical Assistance Network for Children’s Behavioral Health
Jonathan Olson, PhD, Taylor Berntson, BA, Wraparound Evaluation and Research Team, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Michelle Zabel, MSS, Marlene Matarese, PhD, The Institute for Innovation and Implementation, University of Maryland School of Social Work, Baltimore, MD; Eric Bruns, PhD, Wraparound Evaluation and Research Team, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

The National Technical Assistance Network for Children’s Behavioral Health (TA Network) provides ongoing, proactive support to states, communities, and tribes that are implementing systems of care to support youth with complex behavioral health needs. In this presentation, we will review the results of a mixed methods evaluation of the TA Network. Results have revealed a variety of characteristics of TA Network activities that are associated with positive systems- and organization-level outcomes.

3:45 PM – 4:15 PM
Esplanade 1 ~ 30-Minute Paper
Building a Stronger Sampling and Interpretive Framework for System of Care Evaluation: Using the Concept of Social Need
Isaac Karikari, PhD, Social Work, University of North Dakota, Grand Forks, ND; Betty Walton, PhD, Maryanne Kaboi, MSW, School of Social Work/Division of Mental Health and Addiction, Indiana University/Indiana Family and Social Services Administration, Indianapolis, IN

Systems of care (SOC) are integral to the effective delivery of behavioral health services for children and youth. Research and evaluations of SOC implementation are essential in understanding needs and informing improvements. However, the validity and reliability of the results have sometimes been questioned due to study design challenges. Based on a multi-year evaluation of SOC implementation, this empirically-based presentation provides a sampling and interpretive framework for robust assessments of SOCs.

Session 27

2:45 PM – 4:15 PM
Esplanade 2 ~ 90 Minute Symposium
Heavy Traffic Ahead – Consider Alternative Routes:  Improving Care and Throughput in Emergency Crisis and Acute Treatment Services for Children and Youth
Symposium Chair: Robert W. Plant, PhD, Analytics, Quality, and Innovation, Beacon Health Options, Rocky Hill, CT; Discussant: Tim Marshall, LCSW, Clinical and Community Consultation and Support, Connecticut Department of Children and Families, Hartford, CT

Rising psychiatric acuity as indicated by increasing rates of self-harm, suicide rates, and emergency department (ED) and inpatient psychiatric (IP) utilization is a burden to children, youth, and families and challenging to the systems in place to provide care to those in crisis. Increased demand for crisis care further degrades the capacity of current systems resulting in difficulty obtaining timely admissions, longer lengths of inpatient stay, over-crowding, and children “stuck” in the ED. This three-part symposium will review current trends in pediatric ED, IP, and mobile crisis services in the behavioral health service system of one New England state with a particular focus on “throughput” and the bottlenecks that occur at various points in the system. The final portion of the symposium will focus on a discussion of solutions and innovative ideas. Audience participation will be encouraged.

Heavy Traffic Ahead: Acuity, Utilization, & Throughput in Psychiatric Emergency Department (ED) and Psychiatric Inpatient (IP) Care
Erika Sharillo, LCSW, Robert Plant, PhD, Beacon Health Options, Rocky Hill, CT

The presenters will review the evidence supporting increasing psychiatric acuity among children and youth before turning to an analysis of recent trends and findings regarding increasing behavioral health ED and IP utilization, demographic and diagnostic profiles, referral patterns and service use post-discharge, including the phenomenon of youth “stuck” in ED and Inpatient settings. The presenters will also review the impact of fluctuations in system capacity.

Consider Alternative Routes:  Mobile Crisis Service as an Alternative to the ED that Reduces Subsequent ED Utilization
Jeffrey Vanderploeg, PhD, Kellie Randall, PhD, Child Health and Development Institute, Farmington, CT

Mobile Crisis Services in Connecticut present an effective alternative to ED visits for youth with behavioral health needs. Presenters will describe elements of Connecticut’s Mobile Crisis Intervention Service, utilization trends, clinical and socio-demographic characteristics of youth served, and provider performance metrics and outcomes. The presenters will also provide a summary of research demonstrating an association between Mobile Crisis utilization and reductions in ED utilization rates.

Consider Alternative Routes: Identifying Solutions and Innovations to Address Gridlock in the Emergency Crisis System for Children and Youth
Tim Marshall, LCSW, Clinical and Community Consultation and Support, CT Department of Children and Families, Hartford, CT; Robert Plant, PhD, Beacon Health Options, Rocky Hill, CT

The third component of the symposium will focus on solutions. The presenters will examine alternative crisis service components, including the use of behavioral health urgent care centers, respite centers, technology supports,  including bed tracking and service routing using GPS, intensive in-home services, and system capacity to address social determinants of health. This section of the symposium will encourage and support dialogue and audience participation to explore participant’s experiences, insights, and innovative ideas.

Session 28 WA

2:45 PM – 3:15 PM
Esplanade 3 ~ 30-Minute Paper
Establishing a Best Practice Model for Wraparound Fidelity Assessment Using Principles of Implementation Science
Philip Benjamin, MA, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Shannon Robshaw, MSW, School of Social Work, University of Maryland, Baltimore, MD; Eric Bruns, PhD, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Wraparound is a widely utilized care coordination model for youth with serious behavioral health needs that aims to preserve resources, improve outcomes, and reduce rates of out-of-home placement. In recent years, fidelity measures, structured training, and coaching approaches by entities such as the National Wraparound Implementation Center (NWIC) have proliferated; however, this can cause measurement dilemmas. This session will aim to increase clarity by applying implementation science to measurement decisions for wraparound implementation.

3:15 PM – 3:45 PM
Esplanade 3 ~ 30-Minute Paper
From Implementation to Outcomes: Exploring How Implementation Factors Impact Fidelity and Youth-Level Outcomes in Wraparound
Tony Bonadio, PhD, The Institute for Innovation and Implementation, University of Maryland School of Social Work, Baltimore, MD

The Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR) provides an overarching model for understanding how organizational factors, both external and internal, can impact service delivery and, ultimately, youth-level outcomes. Using the CFIR framework, several measures have been developed or adopted to assess the constructs outlined in the framework for Wraparound implementation. The current study used a measure of Wraparound implementation to demonstrate the impacts that Inner Setting factors have on the delivery and outcomes of Wraparound.

3:45 PM – 4:15 PM
Esplanade 3 ~ 30-Minute Paper

Examining Outcomes of Wraparound Using the Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths: Results from a Matched Comparison Study
Spencer Hensley, MA, Eric J. Bruns, PhD, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA

Wraparound care coordination has been widely implemented but controlled outcomes studies are few. This study examined change on the Child and Adolescent Needs and Strengths (CANS) measure for N=129 Wraparound-enrolled youth versus a matched comparison group. Wraparound youth had more needs resolved but more needs discovered at 6 months than similar youth receiving other services. Results shine light on both Wraparound’s potential for impact and use of CANS as an evaluation measure.

Session 29 Y&YA

2:45 PM – 4:15 PM
Palma Ceia 1 ~ 90 Minute Symposium
Bridging the Gap in Behavioral Health Treatment for Justice-Involved Emerging Adults: Research Updates, Description and Real-World Examples for Multisystemic Therapy for Emerging Adults (MST-EA)
Symposium Chair: Francesca Sciscenti, MSW, Community Solutions, Inc., Baltimore, MD; Discussant: Ashli J. Sheidow, PhD, Oregon Social Learning Center

Despite increased risk factors for the emerging adult (ages 17-26) population, there is a lack of adequate or specialized behavioral health services offered. Multisystemic Therapy for Emerging Adults (MST-EA) aims to bridge the current gap in service delivery through an intensive treatment program that is an adaptation of standard MST. MST-EA is intended to provide specialized clinical services tailored for young adults who have co-occurring problems and a history of systems involvement. MST-EA aims to improve key areas in the emerging adult’s life, such as independent living skills and educational or vocational goals. MST-EA strives to engage the young adult in such a way that the young adult has autonomy over their treatment and goals. This symposium will provide an overview of the MST-EA model and the current state of MST-EA research, as well as walk you through case examples to highlight how MST-EA is implemented.

Model Description of Multisystemic Therapy for Emerging Adults (MST-EA)
Ashli J. Sheidow, PhD, Oregon Social Learning Center, Eugene, OR

MST-EA is an intensive treatment program for young people aged 17-26 at the highest risk for negative outcomes. To date, MST-EA has been delivered in a handful of locations, with referrals including juvenile and adult justice system-involved clients, youth aging out of foster care, prison re-entry populations, as well as young adults in supported housing programs. The goals of MST-EA will be described, along with the service delivery model and interventions employed within MST-EA.

Research Updates for Multisystemic Therapy for Emerging Adults (MST-EA)

In the second presentation, the lead MST-EA researcher will summarize the current state of the research that has been conducted on MST-EA. While MST is a well-established effective intervention in juveniles, MST-EA research is at an earlier stage. Specifically, an open trial, program evaluation, and alpha testing of MST-EA vocational coaches have been completed. Currently, MST-EA is being examined in two NIH-funded randomized controlled trials in various locations.

Case Examples Highlighting Components of Multisystemic Therapist for Emerging Adults (MST-EA)
Maryann Davis, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA

The behavioral health system faces unique and complex challenges when it comes to providing treatment for emerging adults (ages 17-26). MST-EA provides a framework for clinical teams to implement to support young adults with achieving their goals and overcoming the complexity of issues they are facing. The successes, barriers, and outcomes reached while implementing MST-EA will be highlighted through case examples.

Session 30

2:45 PM – 3:15 PM
Palma Ceia 2 ~ 30-Minute Paper
Technological Innovations for Ensuring High Fidelity Wraparound Model Integrity in a Multi-Site Demonstration Project
Thomas LaPorte, PhD, Jennifer Ciccone, Center for Human Services Research, Albany, NY; Kimberly Heffner, New York State’s Wraparound Training and Implementation Institute, New York State Office of Mental Health, Albany, NY

Fidelity assessment is critical for monitoring and replicating practice models such as High Fidelity Wraparound. Bringing models to scale, however, can increase the complexity of fidelity assessment, requiring methods that are efficient but rigorous. This presentation will demonstrate one promising approach of integrating service records and fidelity assessments into a single online information management and reporting system to which evaluators, providers, supervisors, and administrators all have access.

3:15 PM – 3:45 PM
Palma Ceia 2 ~ 30-Minute Paper
An Exploration of the Best Ways to Ask Youth and Young Adults with SMHC About Gender Identity
Kathryn Sabella, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA

Measures of gender identity are continually being developed to ensure they are respectful, non-discriminant, and all-inclusive. This paper will describe how gender identity questions were revised and piloted as part of a more extensive study with youth and young adults, ages 16-25, with serious mental health conditions. The resulting gender identity questions were well-received and offered participants a wide array of options to capture their diverse identities. Findings can inform future research and evaluation.

3:45 PM – 4:15 PM
Palma Ceia 2 ~ 30-Minute Paper
Using Financial Mapping to Examine Behavioral Health Service Provision: A Statewide Multi-Year Financial Map
Christopher Bory, PsyD, Robert Plant, PhD, Quality, Beacon Health Options, Rocky Hill, CT; Tim Marshall, LCSW, Department of Children and Families, Hartford, CT

Financial mapping is the process in which a system conducts an assessment of how public dollars are spent on behavioral health services and supports. This process can support systems to identify utilization patterns and inform the development of a comprehensive financial plan. This presentation will describe one State’s experience in conducting a multi-year financial map for children’s behavioral health services with results broken down by funding source, level of care, diagnostic categories, and demographics.

Session 31

2:45 PM – 3:15 PM
Palma Ceia 3 ~ 30-Minute Discussion
Equity and Justice: Advancing Structural Competence and Cultural Humility in Behavioral Health
Maria Avila, PhD, MSW, University of Vermont Larner College of Medicine, Burlington, VT

This session will focus on the connection between behavioral health, social, educational, and racial disparities. Through interactive activities, participants will engage in dialogue and learning about the historical context of systems of oppression in the US and their long-term impact on unserved/underserved populations. Participants will also engage in discussions around the stages of structural competence and elements of cultural humility, National CLAS Standards, and best practices for addressing and eliminating behavioral health disparities.

3:15 PM – 3:45 PM
Palma Ceia 3 ~ 30-Minute Paper
Disrupting Disparities: A Collaborative Practice Approach to Improving Child Mental Health Access
Katherine Grimes, MD, MPH, Department of Psychiatry, Cambridge Health Alliance, Cambridge, MA; Malak Rafla, M.D, Lindsay Dibona, LICSW, Psychiatry, Cambridge Health Alliance, Cambridge, MA  

Social determinants of health, including poverty, racism, and linguistic and cultural isolation contribute to differences in how, when and whether children with mental health needs present for care. This paper focused on examining the impact of integrated pediatric care on child mental health access and engagement. The Enhancing Systems of Care (E-SOC) integrated care team-based approach for children and adolescents, inclusive of peer-to-peer parent support, was piloted for 360 study participants within a highly diverse urban safety-net hospital.  Pre-post data indicate greater improvements in treatment access for the study group than for controls, along with statistically significant positive change in clinical functioning. The E-SOC model of care, with its emphasis on early identification of needs, accuracy of diagnosis, and peer-to-peer facilitation of treatment engagement, appears to offer promise as a way to improve child mental health outcomes.

Session 32

2:45 PM – 3:15 PM
Palma Ceia 4 ~ 30-Minute Paper
Health Effects of the Alberta Wildfires: Understanding Trauma and Resilience in the Lives of Children and Youth
Julie Drolet, PhD, Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary, Edmonton, CAN

The Alberta wildfires resulted in devastating human, economic, and environmental impacts. Very little research has examined pediatric resilience (5-18 years) in disaster-affected communities. This presentation will share research findings from a three-year study on the effects of the Alberta wildfires on children and youth to better understand the social, economic, cultural, personal, and health factors that contribute to positive mental health and resiliency. Implications for policies and trauma-informed programs will be discussed.

3:15 PM – 3:45 PM
Palma Ceia 4 ~ 30 Minute Paper
Utilizing Supervision in Child Welfare to Implement Trauma-Informed Care
Melissa Bernstein, PhD, Brent Crandal, PhD, Andrea Hazen, PhD, Al Killen-Harvey, LCSW, Chadwick, Rady Children’s Hospital, San Diego, CA

Using an evidence-informed model for trauma-informed system change, the Advancing California’s Trauma-Informed Systems (ACTS) project presents a case study of supervision in child welfare as a means to address Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS) amongst child-welfare workers. We will show findings from a California county child welfare system before and after implementation of a trauma-informed care training and trauma-informed supervision group.

3:45 PM – 4:15 PM
Palma Ceia 4 ~ 30-Minute Paper
How Research on the Link Between Child Welfare and Animal Abuse Has Influenced State and Federal Policy
MaryLou Randour, PhD, Animal Welfare Institute, Washington DC

There is established research on the link between animal abuse and child welfare, which has resulted in policy changes at the state and federal level. This presentation critically reviews the research supporting consideration of animal abuse in child welfare. Court decisions citing animal cruelty in parental rights and enacted and proposed state and federal legislation, such as adding animal cruelty to the National Child Abuse and Neglect Data System, will be presented.

Session 33

2:45 PM – 3:15 PM
Garrison Suite ~ 30-Minute Paper
Systems of Care in Tribal Communities – Lessons Learned
May Yamate, MS, Abram Rosenblatt, PhD, Chandria Jones, PhD, Westat, Rockville, MD

Given the rich diversity of tribal communities in the United States, designing and implementing national and local evaluation requires thoughtful planning that balances approaches that reflect the individual tribal community while at the same time meeting grant requirements. This presentation provides examples of lessons learned the evaluation efforts from the Substance Abuse Mental Health Service Administration Children’s Mental Health Initiative.

3:15 PM – 4:15 PM
Garrison Suite ~ 60 Minutes Paper

Assessing Family Voice on Councils, Committees, Governance Boards and Decision-Making Bodies
Malisa Pearson, FREDLA, Lansing, MI

To fully realize family-driven care services and systems, we must draw from the expertise and leadership of family members on our decision-making structures. However, decision-making structures often lack the knowledge and resources necessary to integrate family voice effectively. FREDLA partnered with the Pathways Research & Training Center to create the FAM-VOC assessment tool. This tool measures how decision-making bodies support family-voice and leadership and provides strategies for establishing and strengthening policies and practices.