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Powerpoint slide decks that we have permission to share have been converted to pdf format and are hyperlinked with the title of the presentation. Enjoy!

Learn more about special tracks offered during the conference

Tuesday, March 6, 2018, 10:00 am - 11:30 am

Session 34yya

10:00 am - 11:30 am
Bayshore 5 ~ (90-minute Symposium)

SAMHSA’s Healthy Transitions National Evaluation: Preliminary Process, System and Client Outcomes
Symposium Chair: Kirstin Painter, PhD, Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Rockville, MD; Discussant: Emily Lichvar, PhD, Center for Mental Health Services, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Rockville, MD

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) Healthy Transitions (HT) grant program supports 16 grantees to increase awareness and identification of mental health conditions among youth and young adults (16 – 25 years) and develop effective services and interventions. This symposium will summarize early baseline findings from the HT national evaluation including community and state system assessments, implementation inputs, activities, and challenges, and young adult participant demographics with some six-month follow-up data.

Baseline System-Level Outcomes from the Healthy Transitions (HT) National Evaluation
Janet Walker, PhD, Portland State University, Portland, OR

The Healthy Transitions national evaluation design includes an assessment of system-level impact at both the state and community level. Two web-based surveys are used to assess outcomes at these levels: the Community Support for Transition Inventory (CSTI) and the State Support for Transition Inventory (SSTI). This paper reports on the baseline findings for the CSTI and SSTI summarized across HT grantees.

Early Participant-Level Outcomes from the Healthy Transitions (HT) National Evaluation
Heather Ringeisen, PhD, Survey Research Division, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC; Chelsea Burfeind, PhD, Behavioral Health and Criminal Justice, RTI International, Research Triangle Park, NC

This presentation will summarize preliminary findings from SAMHSA’s National Outcome Measure (NOMs) data to describe HT program participant characteristics at enrollment as well as changes observed in those participants who continued to be enrolled in services six months later. Significant reductions were noted in participants’ report of psychological distress, any nights homeless in the past month, as well as any use of hospital or emergency room for mental health care in the past 30 days.

Inputs and Activities in the Early Implementation of Healthy Transitions (HT) Grants
Kathryn Sabella, PhD; Amanda Costa, MA, Department of Psychiatry, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA    

The HT process evaluation focuses on measuring inputs (e.g. local demography, prior system coordination) and activities (e.g. outreach efforts, youth and family involvement) undertaken across NITT-HT grantees to produce the intended outcomes. This presentation will describe observed differences across grantees in terms of the evidence-based practices being delivered, the use of YA peers, and state-level coordination. Some common challenges, and the solutions for overcoming these challenges will also be described. 

Session 35ebp

10:00 am - 11:30 am
Bayshore 6 ~ (90-minute Symposium)

Promoting Evidence-Based Practice in Statewide System of Care: the New Hampshire Match Learning Collaborative
Symposium Chair: Robert Franks, PhD, Judge Baker Children's Center, Boston, MA; Discussant: George Ake III, PhD, Center for Child and Family Health, Duke Medical Center, Durham, NC

This symposium will provide a comprehensive overview of efforts by the Judge Baker Children's Center to promote an established modular evidence-based practice, the Modular Approach to Therapy for Children with Anxiety, Depression, Trauma, or Conduct Problems (MATCH-ADTC) in the statewide community mental health system in New Hampshire.

The MATCH Treatment Model: Training, Consultation, Supervision, and Sustainability
Daniel Cheron, PhD, Judge Baker Children's Center, Boston, MA

In this presentation, participants will learn about MATCH-ADTC, the EBP implemented in this statewide Learning Collaborative. Special attention will be paid to methods for providing training and consultation to therapists and supervisors in MATCH using both live and distance-learning techniques, methods for monitoring clinical progress throughout the initiative, and strategies for maintaining a sustainable workforce trained in the intervention. Preliminary outcomes that support the use of MATCH will be provided.

Assessing Organizational Readiness as a Tool to Promote the Successful Implementation of EBP's
Robert Franks, PhD, Judge Baker Children's Center, Boston, MA

This presentation will focus on how the Judge Baker Children's Center used an enhanced change package that included a structured readiness tool developed by Wandersman and Scaccia to assess organizational readiness within multiple sites as part of a statewide learning collaborative to implement the EBP MATCH-ADTC. Further, the organization's capacities to successfully implement the model were assessed. These data were utilized to inform the implementation process and provide tailored technical assistance to participating agencies.

Tools and Methods to Implement EBP's with Good Outcomes: the New Hampshire MATCH-ADTC Learning Collaborative
Charlotte Vieira, MPH; Rachel Kim, PhD, Judge Baker Children's Center, Boston, MA    

This presentation will describe the structured Learning Collaborative methodologies used to implement MATCH-ADTC within a statewide system of care in New Hampshire. Strategies that include the use of metric and outcome data to facilitate implementation, use of consultation and technical assistance, coaching, affinity groups and ongoing quality improvement strategies such as Plan-Do-Study-Act cycles. In addition, strategies for local adaptations and sustainability planning will be provided. These strategies can be used in other systems of care. 


Session 36cw

10:00 am - 10:30 am
Bayshore 7 ~ (30-minute Paper)

Well Being - A Multi-Systems Approach to Improving Outcomes for Children, Youth and Families
Lyman Legters, MPA, Systems Improvement, Casey Family Programs, Greenbelt, MD

Comprehensive attention to the well-being needs of young people is everybody’s job, yet nobody’s job. Systems serving children, youth, and families each have a particular focus, mission, and realm of responsibility, yet no one system has responsibility for the whole young person across multiple life domains. Investing to Improve the Well Being of Youth and Young Adults suggests a cross-systems framework for increased focus on well-being, and offers a set of recommendations for consideration.

10:30 am - 11:00 am
Bayshore 7 ~ (30-minute Paper)

A Comparison of Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transsexual Questioning Youth and Heterosexual Youth in the Child Welfare System: Mental Health and Substance Abuse Occurrence and Outcomes
Kirstin
Painter, PhD, Center for Mental Health Services, Division of Service and System Improvement, Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Rockville, MD; Maria Scannapieco, PhD, Social Work, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington, MD

This presentation will report on a study evaluating the mental health symptoms; substance use; strengths; and functioning of LGBTQ youth in the child welfare system compared to heterosexual youth in the child welfare system. The purpose of this study was to examine the mental health outcomes of youth and young adults in the child welfare system that identified as being LGBTQ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, or questioning) compared to those who identified as heterosexual.

11:00 am - 11:30 am
Bayshore 7 ~ (30-minute Paper)

Wraparound Redesign in Child Welfare Family Preservation and Reunification Programming to Maximize Outcomes
Gina Klyachkin, MSW; Elizabeth Croney, MSW; Megan Moore, MSW, KVC Kentucky, Lexington, KY

KVC Kentucky, a large behavioral health and child welfare agency, innovated their approach through a systematic redesign of their family preservation and reunification service delivery to Wraparound service delivery with an emphasis on a comprehensive family assessment. Preliminary redesign outcomes will be provided including TOM 2.0 results, program success rates, recidivism rates, and consumer satisfaction rates. Lessons learned including strengths and areas for potential growth will be discussed. 

Session 37bhe

10:00 am - 10:30 am
Esplanade 1 ~ (30-minute Paper)

Culture, Care and Challenges: A Survey of Massachusetts Families
Lisa Lambert, BA, Parent/Professional Advocacy League, Boston, MA; Emily Sherwood, MPA, Massachusetts Department of Mental Health, Boston, MA

Parent/Professional Advocacy League surveyed more than 200 Massachusetts families whose children had mental health needs to determine how their experiences varied by race and culture. Parents differed in how respected they felt, whether their concerns were taken seriously or dismissed, and if they agreed with professionals. A discussion of how these findings reflect other disparities in the child-serving system will follow.

10:30 am - 11:30 am
Esplanade 1 ~ (60-minute Symposium)

Child Demographic Differences in Utilization of Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Mobile Crisis Intervention Services in Connecticut
Symposium Chair: Jeana Bracey, PhD,
Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, Inc., Farmington, CT; Discussant: Judith C. Meyers, Children's Fund of Connecticut, Farmington, CT

This symposium will highlight data from two innovative programs in Connecticut, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Mobile Crisis Intervention Services. By focusing on demographic characteristics of child participants and their association with the child’s treatment and outcomes, the presentations will aim to inform a discussion on how different demographic groups experience trauma and mobile crisis treatments. This symposium aims to foster a dialogue about how to further strengthen and improve these interventions.

Exploring the Characteristics and Outcomes of Children Receiving Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy in Connecticut
Kyle Barrette, MSW, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Coordinating Center, Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, Inc., Farmington, CT; Ashley Nelson, MATCH-ADTC, Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, Inc., Farmington, CT; Kellie Randall, PhD, Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Coordinating Center, Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, Inc., Farmington, CT; Jason Lang, PhD, Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, Inc., Farmington, CT

This presentation reviews data on the characteristics of children receiving a trauma-focused mental health treatment over a period of two years. This presentation explores the ways in which child characteristics, such as race/ethnicity, age, gender and child welfare involvement, are associated with trauma exposure, initial symptoms, and treatment outcomes. Findings are presented to inform a discussion on how different child populations experience trauma treatment and the implications this poses for behavioral health equity.

Trends in Racial and Ethnic Differences in Diagnosis and Outcomes of Mobile Crisis Intervention Services in Connecticut
Eva Haldane, PhD, Mobile Crisis and School-Based Diversion Initiative, Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, Inc., Farmington, Connecticut; Adora Harizaj, Mobile Crisis and CONNECT, Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, Inc., Farmington, CT; Jeffrey Vanderploeg, PhD, Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut, Inc., Farmington, CT 

This presentation explores the role of race and ethnicity in referrals, presenting problems, diagnosis and reason for discharge of children to a state-wide Mobile Crisis program over a four year period in Connecticut (N=54,456). This presentation also aims to explore if there are any lasting trends that can be addressed and potential changes to improve the mobile crisis services in Connecticut and nationwide. 

Session 38fe

10:00 am - 10:30 am
Esplanade 2 ~ (30-minute Paper)

The Family Research Partnership: Building and Maintaining a National Collaborative for Research
Millie Sweeney, MS, Family-Run Executive Director Leadership Association, Ellicott City, MD

For several years, the Family Research Partnership has engaged a broad national coalition of stakeholders to identify priorities and funding opportunities for research on parent peer support. Aside from laying the groundwork for successful research proposals, the greatest accomplishment is the establishment and maintenance of a unified and well-functioning Partnership that is national in scope. This paper outlines processes employed to maintain a multi-year national partnership of family leaders, researchers, and stakeholders committed to collaborative research.

10:30 am - 11:30 am
Esplanade 2 ~ (60-minute Discussion Hour)

Family-Run Organizations and Readiness to Participate in Research: The Family Research Partnership’s Experience in the PCORI Pipeline to Proposal Process
Millie
Sweeney, MS; Jane Walker, MSW, Family-Run Executive Director Leadership Association, Ellicott City, MD; Eric Bruns, PhD, Dept. of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Bruno Anthony, PhD, SOM-PSYCH, University of Colorado Denver; Children's Hospital of Colorado, Aurora, CO

The Family Research Partnership, engaging a broad coalition of national stakeholders through PCORI’s Pipeline to Proposal grant, identified priorities and opportunities for research around parent peer support. This discussion hour details the recent efforts to identify communities and family-run organizations for partnership in research and the challenges encountered in their level of readiness for research. Challenges and strategies will be explored through peer-led discussion, informing the work in the final tier of the initiative.

Session 39wa

10:00 am - 10:30 am
Esplanade 3 ~ (30-minute Paper)

Data-Driven Coaching: Moving the TIC Needle from Policy to Practice
Leanne Delsart, MS; Jenna Reetz, MSW, Wraparound Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI

Using concrete examples as a vehicle for discussion, Data Driven Coaching: Moving theTrauma Informed Care needle from policy to practice walks through how Wraparound Milwaukee uses data to drive trauma-informed policy revision and compliance measurement, training/coaching to trauma-informed supervision and service delivery, and development of practice tools to support the implementation of trauma-informed principles and respect for exposure and impact in the daily work with youth and families using the Wraparound process.

10:30 am - 11:00 am
Esplanade 3 ~ (30-minute Paper)

Developing Strong Leaders and a Competent Workforce: Growing Pains and Triumphs!
Megan French, MSW; Sharon Gentry, M.Ed, Lutheran Community Services Northwest, Kennewick, WA

Lutheran Community Services experienced a 300% growth over the past four years. Learn how commitment to providing high-fidelity wraparound while developing and maintaining a confident, competent workforce and a solid infrastructure to support this unprecedented growth was achieved. Specific topics will include recruiting and hiring, the onboarding process, and the necessity for a solid coaching framework. This session will also highlight how a culture that promotes staff retention was created.

11:00 am - 11:30 am
Esplanade 3 ~ (30-minute Paper) 

Use It, Don't Lose It: Using Existing Data to Inform Wraparound Coaching and Improve Outcomes
Cary Brown, MS, Ascent, Monroe, LA

This presentation follows one Wraparound agency’s attempts to integrate existing disparate sources of data as a part an ongoing CQI process. The presentation will look at how the goal to provide high quality/ high fidelity Wraparound led to using several simple, specific measures that were already being collected in order to change how facilitators were coached and how it has impacted the day-to-day service delivery. 

Session 40yya

10:00 am - 10:30 am
Palma Ceia 1 ~ (30-minute Paper)

Mental Health Symptoms and Employment in Adolescents with Mental Illness in the Justice System
Edward Mulvey, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA

There is widespread concern about the needs of adolescents with mental illness involved in the justice system. Yet little is known about the relationship between employment and mental health status to guide these efforts. This paper presents intraindividual analyses that examine how mental health symptoms affect employment and vice versa. Results indicate that symptoms negatively affect employment, but employment does not affect symptoms. These findings indicate a need for supported employment for these adolescents.

10:30 am - 11:00 am
Palma Ceia 1 ~ (30-minute Paper)

Developing Academic Self-Management Skills among College Students with Mental Health Conditions: Executive Functioning Skills that Promote Success
Michelle Mullen, MS;
Amy Banko, MS; Brittany Stone, MS, Psychiatric Rehabilitation & Counseling Professions, Rutgers University, Scotch Plains, NJ

Students with mental health conditions are at greater risk of attrition than any other student disability group. Many people believe that the classic symptoms of the mental health condition are the reasons why these students struggle with their coursework. Recent research from Rutgers University suggest that while mental health symptoms play a role that perhaps the greater issue associated with academic performance is underdeveloped executive functioning (EF) skills. This session will briefly describe common academic implications to under-developed EF skills. The session will describe a manualized cognitive remediation intervention (FAST) that focuses on developing skills and strategies to enhance academic performance among college students with mental health conditions.

11:00 am - 11:30 am

Palma Ceia 1 ~ (30-minute Paper)

Elevating Young Professionals with Lived Expertise Through Coaching
Lacy (Kendrick Burk) Dicharry, MS, MBA, Elevate YP, Baton Rouge, LA; Stephanie Sikes, Elevate YP, Frankfort, LA

Elevate YP will share experiences in coaching young people with their lived experience to push forward and reach their potential in their profession. This workshop provides insight to best practices in coaching, anecdotal experiences, and data from surveys of young adult coaches and coachees; defines coaching, coaching strategies and lessons learned; and coaching tools that can be easily applied. Join us for an experience that will transform the way you support lived-expertise in your agency. 

Session 41yya

10:00 am - 10:30 am
Palma Ceia 2 ~ (30-minute Paper)

Achieving Stable Housing for Young Adults: Important Considerations
Nancy Koroloff, PhD; Barbara Friesen, PhD, Research and Training Center for Pathways to Positive Futures, Portland State University, Portland, OR

This paper will report on a policy analysis undertaken at the Pathways RTC. The overall purpose of the project was to examine policies and practices that may help or hinder young adults’ efforts to find and maintain stable housing. The paper includes recommendations about program dimensions, policy change, and practice modifications designed to better support young adults who are trying to live independently.

10:30 am - 11:00 am
Palma Ceia 2 ~ (30-minute Paper)

Transitional Living Programs for At-Risk Runaway and Homeless Youth: Comprehensive Care for the Most Vulnerable LGBTQ Youth and Young Adults
Kimberly
Fuller, PhD, MSW, MEd; Cathleen Lewandowski, PhD, MSW, School of Social Work, Cleveland State University, Cleveland, OH; Ben Wenger, MBA, MSSA, LISW-S, Bellefaire JCB, Cleveland, OH

Transitional Living Programs support runaway and homeless youth (RHY) by providing housing while participants develop independent living skills. This model is being piloted in Cleveland with LGBTQ RHY. Findings indicate a substantial need for comprehensive care services within the LGBTQ community, and further suggests that when providing services, youth start to develop some, but not all, skills needed for independent living. Areas of resilience, barriers to success, as well as areas of future growth are discussed.

11:00 am - 11:30 am
Palma Ceia 2 ~ (30-minute Paper)

A Mixed-Method Evaluation of a Statewide Transitional Housing Program for Young Adults with Mental Health Disorders
John
Holland, PhD, LCSW; Jennifer Abbatemarco, LCSW, Office of the Commissioner, State of Connecticut Department of Mental Health & Addiction Services, Middletown, CT

In Connecticut, the Department of Mental Health and Addiction Services Young Adult Service (YAS) program offers a pioneering approach to supporting high-risk, high-need young adults as they transition into local communities. YAS Transitional Apartment Programs provide intensive, on-site recovery services to young adults with mental health challenges and significant experiences of childhood abuse. This opportunity to experience apartment living allows young adults to develop foundational skills for community living in a safe, pro-growth setting. 

Session 42 

10:00 am - 10:30 am
Palma Ceia 3 ~ (30-minute Paper)

Adverse Childhood Experiences Among Youth Reported to Child Welfare: Results from the National Survey of Child & Adolescent Wellbeing
Antonio Garcia, PhD, School of Social Policy & Practice, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; Meera Gupta, MD, MSCE, University of Kentucky Health Transplant Division, Lexington, KY; Johanna K.P. Greeson, PhD, School of Social Policy & Practice, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA; Allison Thompson, PhD, Philadelphia Department of Human Services, Philadelphia, PA; Christina DeNard, PhD,University of Illinois at Chicago, IL

No research to date has examined the prevalence of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) and their effects on social, emotional, and behavioral (SEB) outcomes among youth reported to the child welfare system (CWS). Findings highlight the most prevalent ACEs and show that mental health service use does not buffer against the impact they have on poor SEB outcomes. Attendees will learn about and discuss evidence-informed strategies to improve service provision for youth who experience ACEs.

10:30 am - 11:30 am
Palma Ceia 3 ~ (60-minute Symposium)

Efforts to Promote Effective Implementation of Best Practices in Trauma-Informed Care for Children: Screening, Assessment, and Evidence-Based Treatment
Symposium Co-Chairs: Angela M. Tunno, PhD,
 Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC; Heather Pane-Seifert, PhD, MPP, North Carolina Child Treatment Program, Center for Child and Family Health, Durham, NC; Discussant: Angela M. TunnoPhDDepartment of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC

This symposium will describe current implementation efforts at each stage of a child’s journey through trauma-informed screening, assessment (e.g., measurement-based care), and evidence-based treatment. Several key efforts to promote best practices involve the Project Broadcast Trauma Screening Tool (screening), the National Child Traumatic Stress Network’s Clinical Improvement through Measurement Initiative (CIMI; assessment) and the North Carolina Child Treatment Program (treatment). Lessons learned from implementation efforts will be discussed.

Implementation of Statewide Trauma Screening in Child Welfare: North Carolina Project Broadcast
George "Tripp" AkePhDDepartment of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Center for Child and Family Health, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC

Project Broadcast, a statewide effort to improve trauma-informed care for children in the North Carolina child welfare system, targeted the development and implementation of trauma-informed screening for children in state custody. In this presentation, an overview of Project Broadcast, the development and implementation of the trauma screener, and lessons learned from implementation will be provided. A focus on initial outcomes yielded from the Project Broadcast trauma screener will also be discussed.

Implementing Measurement-Based Care in Child Mental Health Settings: Initial Results from the NCTSN Clinical Improvement through Measurement Initiative
Carrie P. Trunzo, MHA, CPHQDuke Psychiatry and Behavioral Science, UCLA-Duke University National Center for Child Traumatic Stress, Durham, NC; Ernestine Briggs-King, PhD; Angela M. Tunno, PhD, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, UCLA-Duke University National Center for Child Traumatic Stress, Durham, NC  

The National Child Traumatic Stress Network's (NCTSN) Clinical Improvement through Measurement Initiative (CIMI) facilitates the systemic use of assessment to guide patient-centered behavioral health care (i.e., Measurement-Based Care). This presentation will provide an overview of CIMI, discuss evaluation results from implementation at eight agencies, and recommend strategies for enhancing implementation.

Promoting Effective Implementation of Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy through a State-Wide Training Program
Heather Pane Seifert, PhD, MPP; Beverly Glienke, MA; Mellicent Blythe, LCSW, North Carolina Child Treatment Program, Center for Child and Family Health, Durham, NC; Lisa Amaya-Jackson, MD, MPH, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, NC

The North Carolina Child Treatment Program promotes effective implementation and sustainability of Evidence-Based Treatments for child trauma, including Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT), by training mental health clinicians through Learning Collaboratives (LCs). This presentation will describe training methodology, general training and clinical outcomes, and barriers and facilitators for TF-CBT implementation and sustainability across TF-CBT LCs.


Session 43

10:00 am - 10:30 am
Palma Ceia 4 ~ (30-minute Paper)

Using a Mixed Methods Approach to Evaluate the Impact of Co-Occurring Clubhouses for Youth with Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders
Colleen Smith, MSW; Julia Martin; Ann DiGirolamo, PhD, Georgia Health Policy Center, Center of Excellence for Children's Behavioral Health, Atlanta, GA; Dawne Morgan; Tricia Mills, Georgia Department of Behavioral Health and Developmental Disabilities, Atlanta, GA

Mixed methods approaches are essential to understanding a program’s contribution to outcomes achieved. By employing a mixed-methods approach utilizing participatory and empowerment evaluation principles, the Center of Excellence for Children’s Behavioral Health at the Georgia Health Policy Center discovered the positive influence of a behavioral health program on youth and uncovered the most and least useful components of the model in an effort to aid future programming.

10:30 am - 11:30 am
Palma Ceia 4 ~ (60-minute Symposium)

Multiple Perspectives to Inform the Development of the Connecticut Children’s Behavioral Health Network of Care
Symposium Chair: Joy Kaufman, PhD,
Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT; Discussant: Tim Marshall, MSW, Connecticut Department of Children and Families, Hartford, CT

Connecticut has engaged in a process to obtain ongoing input into the development of the Children’s Behavioral Health Network of Care. This process has included the perspectives of multiple stakeholders including youth and family members, behavioral health providers and pediatricians. This symposium will contain three studies each addressing an aspect of the network of care including: 1) perspective of primary care pediatricians; 2) input from youth and family members obtained through community conversations; and 3) input from behavioral health providers regarding their perceptions of provider collaboration and what else is needed to support youth and families. This symposium will review the common themes that emerge across these studies and how these data inform the continued development of the network of care.

Assessment of Primary Care Pediatrician Provision of Mental Health Care
Steven Rogers, MD, Pediatrics, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Hartford, CT; Kevin Borrup, JD, MPA; Danielle Chenard, Injury Prevention Center, Connecticut Children's Hospital, Hartford, CT

This paper describes factors impacting the provision of mental health care by primary care pediatricians and identifies opportunities for action towards a truly integrated system of the children’s mental health care. The study relies on System Support Mapping (SSM), a focus group-like process, to elicit input from pediatricians and community mental health providers in determining recommendations for action. The study recommendations are supported by confirmatory survey results.

Community Conversations to Assess Family Member Perspectives of Network of Care
Beresford Wilson, JD; Denetra McBride, JD, FAVOR, Inc., Wethersfield, CT

This presentation summarizes community-based participatory research conducted by a family-led organization to solicit the family perspectives on Connecticut’s behavior health networks of care. Family members were engaged as full partners to collect, analyze, and disseminate findings to local communities. This information is being used to inform the ongoing development and implementation of the Connecticut Children’s Behavioral Health Plan. Findings outline the strengths, service gaps, and recommendations for change from the parent/caregivers’ point of view.

Behavioral Health Provider Assessment of Collaboration within a Network of Care
Joy Kaufman, PhD; Siobhan Thompson, MPH; Kathryn Clark, MS; Jessenia Medina, BA, Psychiatry, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT

This paper will describe a qualitative assessment of behavioral health provider’s perspective of the barriers and facilitators to collaboration and what services and supports are needed by children, youth and their families. While data were collected at the regional level, this presentation will highlight the themes that emerge when these qualitative data are analyzed at the state level. Findings outline the strengths and continued areas of growth within the network of care. 
 
Session 44

10:00 am - 11:30 am
Garrison Suite ~ (90-minute Symposium)

Using Medicaid Claims Data to Examine Children's Behavioral Health and Psychotropic Medication Utilization
Symposium Chair: Sheila Pires, MPA,
Human Service Collaborative, Washington, DC; Discussant: Kamala Allen, MHS, Program Operations Child Health Quality, Center for Health Care Strategies Inc., Hamilton, NJ

This symposium encompasses three related presentations focused on using Medicaid claims data to improve the monitoring and use of behavioral health services and psychotropic medications among children in Medicaid. Children in Medicaid with serious behavioral health care needs are a complex and vulnerable population. Without access to a broad array of services (both traditional and alternative), care coordination, and collaboration among child-serving systems, they are at risk for poor outcomes and high costs Use of psychotropic medications for children is a high-priority public sector concern. Rates of psychotropic medication use are especially high among children and youth who typically rely on Medicaid to cover their physical and mental health service needs. As such, children in Medicaid are at a higher risk of experiencing overuse or misuse of behavioral health-related medications. Adverse side effects, including increased risk of obesity and diabetes and risk for drug interactions, make it even more imperative that policymakers and providers work to improve oversight and monitoring of these medications and increase access to alternative non-pharmacological treatments.

Examining Racial and Ethnic Disparities and Disproportionality in the Use of Behavioral Health Services
Jamila McLean, MPH, CHES, Child Health Quality Delivery System and Payment Reform, Center for Health Care Strategies, Hamilton, NJ

This presentation will provide an in-depth analysis of racial and ethnic disparities evident in behavioral health services utilization among children in Medicaid. It will include data across three study years highlighting vulnerable populations and instances of over-representation and under-representation for behavioral health services. Policy implications and recommendations for improving quality of care, and health and cost outcomes will be discussed.

A Longitudinal Analysis of Changes in the Utilization and Expense of Psychotropic Medications by Children in Medicaid
Kamala Allen, MHS, Center for Health Care Strategies, Hamilton, NJ

This presentation will describe the results of a national longitudinal analysis of Medicaid claims data for children in Medicaid from 2005 to 2011. The presentation will highlight changes in the types and expense of psychotropic medications used across three study years. It will also address variations across demographic indicators and the concurrent use of psychotropic medications. Policy implications and recommendations for improving quality of care, and health and cost outcomes will be discussed.

What do Medicaid Data Suggest about Improving Use of Behavioral Health Services and Psychotropic Medication in the Foster Care Population?
Sheila A Pires, MPA, Human Service Collaborative, Washington, DC     

This presentation will provide an in-depth analysis of the use of behavioral health services and psychotropic medications by foster children in Medicaid from 2005 to 2011. It will highlight comparisons in the use and expense of behavioral health services and psychotropic medications among children in foster care and children enrolled in Medicaid via TANF or disability criteria. Implications for state oversight of psychotropic medications and policy recommendations for improving quality of care will be discussed. 

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