News

Youths cautiously sharing mental health histories

July 16, 2012

Chandra Watts is part of a program called Strategic Sharing, which helps young people who have struggled with mental health issues talk about their past in selective ways.Great story in the Boston Globe this morning featuring Chandra Watts of Youth MOVE Massachusetts, who speaks openly and candidly about the political and personal dilemma inherent in being an active voice for youth with mental health challenges but also needing to protect her identity as she enters the adult world.

from the article in the Globe…

  • More than any previous group of American youth, Chandra Watts and her peers grew up hearing about ADHD, bipolar, and Prozac.

    As a generation, they were more psychologically attuned — and diagnosed — than any other. Mental disorders, they were told, should be viewed no differently from physical illnesses, and cause no shame.

    So when Watts was 15 and hospitalized in the midst of severe mood swings, she thought she could safely confide in a good friend. But that friend ended up telling someone else, who told someone else, and then word got out. Watts was devastated.

    “I became known as the School Crazy,” said Watts, now 25 and attending community college in Worcester.

    Chandra Watts is part of a program called Strategic Sharing, which helps young people who have struggled with mental health issues talk about their past in selective ways.

    Seasoned by that experience, but undaunted, Watts is among a growing number of young people wrestling with a political and personal dilemma: They want to lead efforts to curb long-held prejudices against people with mental illness, but must carefully consider what they say publicly to protect their image as they enter the adult world. They also face challenges not confronted by previous generations: The Internet and social networking sites can turn casual remarks into permanent records, easily searched by college admissions officers and potential employers.

Explore More Posts

What Do You Think?

Join The Conversation