Mapping the Effects of the ACA's Health Insurance Coverage Expansions

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The Kaiser Family Foundation has developed a new mapping tool that can show you the percentage of the population in your zip code who could benefit from the Affordable Care Act (ACA).

Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation Health Reform Source
Starting in 2014, most people who are uninsured or buying individual insurance with incomes up to four times the poverty level ($92,200 for a family of four and $44,680 for a single person in 2012) will be eligible for expanded coverage through Medicaid or tax credits to subsidize the cost of private insurance. See what share of the population might be helped in this way in a specific zip code. Try out the map here.

The Affordable Care Act (ACA) includes two primary mechanisms for helping people afford health coverage. First, starting in 2014, most people with family incomes up to 138% of the poverty level ($31,809 for a family of four and $15,415 for a single person in 2012) will be eligible for Medicaid.  Second, people buying coverage through new state-based health insurance exchanges will be eligible for federal tax credits to subsidize the cost of insurance. On average, an estimated 17 percent of the nonelderly population could benefit from the Medicaid expansion and tax credits. In parts of Florida, New Mexico, Texas, Louisiana, and California, between 36-40 percent of population could benefit.  In areas of Massachusetts, Hawaii, New York, and Connecticut – states that generally have high levels of employer-provided health insurance or have already implemented reforms to make insurance more accessible and affordable – 2-4% of the nonelderly population could benefit.  These estimates are best viewed as a way of comparing what share of the population will benefit from the ACA across geographic areas, rather than as precise projections of the effects of the law.

To learn more about these estimates, please read Mapping the Effects of the ACA’s Health Insurance Coverage Expansions.

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