Learn about Mental Health Planning Councils

0 Comments | Posted

If you want to be a change agent for children's mental health then you would benefit from learning more about the planning councils and how you can get involved. In general, children's mental health is not represented as strong as we think it needs to be. Let's work to change that.

Mental Health America is offering a timely introductory webinar overview of Mental Health Planning and Advisory Councils. We think it is critical that Children's Mental Health Network members learn as much as possible about these groups as they are an important part of the decision-making process about how federal mental health block grant money gets spent in the states.

In this webinar you will learn about the statutory requirements of the planning councils and how you can get involved. Judy Stange, Executive Director of the National Association of Mental Health Planning and Advisory Councils, will discuss the general structure of the planning councils and the elements of the councils that make them effective. Shel Gross will discuss his experience on the Wisconsin Council on Mental Health and what has made his state's planning council an effective voice for the mental health community.

An Introduction to Mental Health Planning and Advisory Councils

When: Tuesday, September 6th, 2011 from 2:30 - 4:00 PM EST

Presenters
Judy Stange, Executive Director, National Association of Mental Health Planning and Advisory Councils
Shel Gross, Director of Public Policy, Mental Health America of Wisconsin, and Chair, Wisconsin Council on Mental Health

REGISTER FOR THIS FREE WEBINAR

What are State Mental Health Planning and Advisory Councils?

In 1986, a Federal law was passed that required states to do mental health planning as a condition of receiving federal mental health funds. It further required that the planning process include various stakeholder groups-consumers of mental health services, parents of children with emotional disturbances, family members of adults with serious mental illness, representatives from State agencies: mental health, education, vocational rehabilitation, criminal justice, housing, social services and the state Medicaid agency as well as public and private entities concerned with the need, planning, operation, funding, and use of mental health services and related support services. U.S. States and Territories then formed these councils which now exist in every state.

What do these councils do?

The purpose of the planning councils in each State and Territory is to meaningfully involve concerned citizens in planning and evaluating the mental health service delivery in their states. Defined by Federal law, these councils:

Comments

Leave a Comment