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Friday Update 7-3-15

Greetings faithful readers. What better way to get in the mood for the 4th of July than being inspired by Katy Perry's "Firework." Be sure to watch this video. It has a great message in the lyrics. Quick note - I am almost finished with the review of both the Murphy and Matsui bills. I know, I know, perseveration is my Achilles heel. Pray for completion this holiday weekend… After being inspired by Katy Perry and saying a prayer that I will get the reviews completed, put your goggles on, light your sparkler and get to readin' Friday Update, cuz we got work to do!

Most important reads for this week

Murphy bill (H.R. 2646) as currently written would drive federally funded family and youth organizations into extinction
Okay, I know the full analysis of the Murphy bill is not ready yet, but here is a little morsel to whet your appetite:

Allegheny Family Network hosts Representative Tim Murphy for a discussion on H.R. 2646
Speaking of educating your elected officials... Maria Silva and Ruth Fox of the Allegheny Family Network are doing just that. About 11 months ago, Maria and Ruth joined a few Advisory Council members of the Children's Mental Health Network in a meeting with Congressman Murphy in his Washington, DC office to discuss H.R. 3717 - the precursor to H.R. 2646. At that meeting, Maria told the Congressman he needed to come visit their family organization to learn more about what they do. Eleven months later, Maria's relentless pursuit of securing a visit paid off, and the congressman agreed to visit the Allegheny Family Network and hold a brief conference call with staff and other national family organization executive directors. We are pretty sure it is the first time the Congressman has ever visited a family organization that focuses on the needs of children with mental health challenges and their families. Good on ya, Maria and Ruth. Keep it up!

Social-Emotional Learning is having an impact in urban schools!
One of the Network's most popular Morning Zen contributors, Kevin Dwyer, encourages us to take a closer look at some innovative social-emotional learning taking place in the Cleveland schools. "Cleveland Metropolitan School District was highlighted in Education Week (Evie Blad, June 10, 2015) for its system-wide, yes, system-wide, social-emotional learning (SEL) instruction combined with other best-practice interventions that address school climate and positive conditions for learning. The Ed Week article, Urban Districts Embrace Social-Emotional Learning is a must read for school leaders and education stakeholders to best understand that system-wide SEL and multiple interventions can address real world needs of students to be academically successful."

"Adult Ally" What does it mean to parents?
Hey, don't look now, but there is a movement afoot to sanitize the description of parents who have children with emotional challenges who have turned 18 from "parent" to "adults as allies". Say what? Oh my, has political correctness finally gone too far? Lisa Lambert, Teresa King, and Johanna Bergan will wrestle with this controversial topic in an upcoming Georgetown TA webinar. I think I'm gonna call my three kids and tell them that I am no longer "Pop" but have transitioned to their adult ally. Dang, I wonder if this means I am no longer responsible for tuition, a spare room when they need it, or use of the washer and dryer? Goodness, these are indeed, interesting times...

Check out the updated CHDI website for children's mental health
The newly designed KidsMentalHealthInfo website connects parents and professionals working with young children in Connecticut to information, training and resources on children's mental health. The mobile-friendly site features new training sections for professionals and recently translated Spanish-language content for parents on the critical, but often overlooked issue of infant and early childhood mental health. Hey, CHDI, why don't you guys just accept the fact that you are really good at what you do and become a National TA Center? Gotta share some of that brain power with the rest of the country. Just sayin'...

SAMHSA's National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative launches new campaign
Raising awareness about the impact of child traumatic stress and what parents and caregivers can do to help children recover and thrive is the focus of a new public education campaign launched today by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) and its National Child Traumatic Stress Initiative (NCTSI). The campaign, titled "Helping Kids Recover and Thrive" includes new public service announcements (PSAs) in English and Spanish, as well as a website.

Hot tip - DBASSE launches search for new Director of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families
The Division of Behavioral and Social Sciences and Education (DBASSE) and the Institute of Medicine (IOM) have begun a nationwide search for a Director to lead the activities of the Board on Children, Youth, and Families (BCYF). BCYF brings a multidisciplinary and evidence-based perspective to bear on the development of policies and programs for children, youth, and families, drawing upon the collective knowledge and analytic tools of the behavioral, health and social sciences.

Teen Depression
The updated Teen Depression brochure, developed by our colleagues at NIMH, is now available in print and online.

Boys more likely to have antipsychotics prescribed, regardless of age
Boys are more likely than girls to receive a prescription for anti-psychotic medication regardless of age, researchers have found. Approximately 1.5 percent of boys ages 10-18 received an anti-psychotic prescription in 2010, although the percentage falls by nearly half after age 19. Among anti-psychotic users with mental disorder diagnoses, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was the most common among youth ages 1-18 while depression was the most common diagnosis among young adults ages 19-24 receiving anti-psychotics.

Boys are more likely than girls to receive a prescription for antipsychotic medication regardless of age, researchers have found. Approximately 1.5 percent of boys ages 10-18 received an antipsychotic prescription in 2010, although the percentage falls by nearly half after age 19. Among antipsychotic users with mental disorder diagnoses, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) was the most common among youth ages 1-18, while depression was the most common diagnosis among young adults ages 19-24 receiving antipsychotics. - See more at: http://www.cmhnetwork.org/resources/show?id=909#sthash.DQfNZxVs.dpuf

 

 

 

 

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Scott Bryant-Comstock
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http://cmhnetwork.org

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